My Secret
snowprints

by Judith Geiger
Flying Change Coach

 

The Fall Season, with its marvelous sights and smells, always gets me very excited about what’s to come. I have a secret to tell you about myself, “I LOVE SNOW”. The reason it is pretty much a secret or at least a silent addiction is that I live on a very windy hill where the snow blows our driveway shut often several times a day. When my husband hears me go on and on about HOW PRETTY the snow is he can become a bit of a grump. I have learned to try to curb my enthusiasm although it seldom works.

For years I have tried to figure out what it is about the snow that sends my heart racing and puts a huge smile on face when I see even one or two flakes falling from the sky. I thought perhaps it was the fact that I grew up in Kansas where very little snow fell. When a heavy wet snow would blanket our world, my mom would exclaim “Come see the magnificent site just outside our door.” I would run out and gasp at the site of ice and snow hanging off of the branches as they bent very low to the ground. My first thought was always “My Winter Wonderland.”

Now that I have entered into the world of learning how to retreat I am able to notice when life is speeding up! For me retreating is stepping away from my busy life and finding a special place of calm. This is where I am able to hear my inner voice and refresh my spirit. I wonder if that isn’t a big piece of why I love the snow so much. The word that comes to mind for me now, when it snows, is SILENCE. Especially if we have six inches or more of snow fall in one night. You can then walk outside and not hear a sound. It is as though the world is asleep.

YES, that is it! Snow automatically puts me into retreat mode. I must have even sensed this as a child. I felt the need to slow down and hear the silence. After a couple of hours of making snow men with carrot noses and snow angels on my back, I would go inside the house with renewed spirit because I had just created my own personal retreat. This was long before I ever learned the word retreat or what it meant.

My mittens and boots are ready as I pull the snow shoes out of the cellar once more for a season of snow retreats. As you can tell, I am a bit overly excited since it won’t snow here in Central NY for a least another month or two so in the mean time I will ride my horses in the crisp fall air and listen to the wonderful sound of leaves crunching under their hooves.

My want for all of you is to find your own special way to retreat. Some exciting ways that I retreat are to “first set an intention” of what I want to bring into my life then, do one of the following:

  • I often go for a solitary walk along a country path listening to the birds and my own inner guidance.
  • Get into my car without a destination in mind. Drive until something attracts my attention then spend time doing whatever that is.
  • Sit by a lake, river or any body of water and let my mind drift into mediation.
  • Take a long nap with piles of pillows and a good book.
  • Go away on a week-end of quiet reflection. There are many possibilities here but one that comes to mind is a cabin in the woods.
  • Spend the afternoon in a hot tub or bubble bath. Letting my worries melt away!
  • I love having an afternoon or whole day of pure creativity.
  • Put on the music and dance! I don’t underestimate the power of moving my body.
  • Sip hot tea by the fire or candle light as I read inspirational stories.
  • Make a vision board of what I want to bring into my life.
  • Write in my gratitude journal. When we are able to be grateful for what we already have miracles can appear.
  • Last but not least “I go play in the snow!”

As you can see the possibilities are endless when we realize that we alone have a choice about how we spend our time. It does not have to take very long or be expensive to take yourself on a mini-retreat that can restore you to wholeness.

Whatever your idea of a personal retreat is, I hope you are able to do it often.

 

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Copyright 2008 by Judith Geiger

 

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